Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

A Tru-Oil Finish Mentor

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by TommyChung71, Apr 25, 2011.

  1. old wrench

    old wrench Tele-Meister

    ScotchBrite and MicroMesh, although they are both abrasive pads, are quite different in makeup.

    MicroMesh is designed to give a much smoother finish - it goes beyond (finer and smoother) what we normally achieve using traditional wet sanding paper. That's what the MicroMesh pad really is - a very fine sandpaper with a soft foam backing. I think MM starts out at around 1500 grit and goes up to 8000 grit and for all I know it may be available even finer than that.

    On the other hand, ScotchBrite or any of the similar non-woven abrasives are much more similar to steel wool in the way they achieve a finish. It's a non-woven web of plastic (polypropylene?) with abrasive (silicon carbide or aluminum oxide) embedded in the matrix. The tan pads I've been using are made by 3M, part #7448 ultra fine grade. They are equivalent to 00 steel wool when brand new, but break down after a little use to more like 0000 steel wool. I'm sure you could find something very similar in Germany, just search for "non-woven abrasive pads". If not, steel wool will do the same job, just take care to keep it away from pickups and electrical stuff.

    With guitar necks, a real shiny smooth finish looks nice, and there are lots of different finish coatings you can use to get that shiny look. But, I find that a nice shiny buffed finish just ends up feeling "sticky". I think that "sticky-ness" is a condition caused more by the highly polished surface than the type of finish coating used, but no doubt there are some types of coatings that just feel "stickier" than others. For me, a nicely done TruOil finish followed up a rub with tan scotchbrite just feels "right". It feels similar (but not quite the same!) to an old neck that's been played for thousands of hours and had most of the finish worn off, which of course is another way to get there and have that nice "feel" :).

    Best Regards,
    Geo.
     
    stefanhotrod likes this.

  2. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Aug 3, 2010
    Loganville, Ga.
    My experience is that Scotchbrite pads burnish too much for my liking, I prefer the cutting action of 0000 steel wool. If you use quality steel wool, you won't get visible scratches, but certainly do be careful to keep the fuzzies away from your pick ups.
     
    Vespa_One and stefanhotrod like this.

  3. stefanhotrod

    stefanhotrod TDPRI Member

    Age:
    39
    22
    Aug 27, 2016
    germany
    Thanks, I was able to get the recommanded 3M #7448 and it works like steelwool without the steel dust mess. Thanks a lot!

     

  4. stefanhotrod

    stefanhotrod TDPRI Member

    Age:
    39
    22
    Aug 27, 2016
    germany
    So everything worked fine, thanks again.
    On the other hand, how can I smooth out the headstock to an even gloss for decal applying (my first attempt was bad, the decal silvered because of the too matte Truoil surface). I don‘t want to use a liquid polish. Is polishing out the TO layer with just a soft rag enough to generate a smooth- enough surface for the decal?
     

  5. GS37

    GS37 TDPRI Member

    Age:
    63
    21
    May 27, 2017
    Oakland
    After I spray my maple neck with StewMac's (aged clear) nitrocellulose lacquer (for an amber look) and let it cure, would a few coats of Tru Oil be safe for a final topcoat? Thanks in advance.
     

  6. harold h

    harold h Tele-Afflicted

    Feb 15, 2004

    You dont need the Tru Oil if you used lacquer.

    The Stew Mac stuff is very good.
     

  7. GS37

    GS37 TDPRI Member

    Age:
    63
    21
    May 27, 2017
    Oakland
    Thanks, Harold. I'm on my way.
     

  8. old wrench

    old wrench Tele-Meister

    Usually you can get a nice semi-gloss with Truoil which should be plenty smooth enough for a decal.

    If the surface is a little lumpy now, you could always sand it flat using a stiff back-up pad and some fine sandpaper like 600 grit, and then apply another finish coat of Truoil.

    If the surface is flat already but just matte finished, I'd think just applying another finish coat of Truoil on the headstock or just the front face of the headstock should do it.

    You may or may not also want to protect the decal with some sort of finish. I really don't know if Truoil would work for that or not, but I wouldn't think it would offer the decal much protection.
    Maybe a few coats of shellac over the front face of the headstock and decal? Or, a good coat of shellac followed by some rattlecan clear laquer?
    It would be real easy to mask off the neck and confine the protective coating to just the front face of the headstock.

    Best Regards,
    Geo.
     
    stefanhotrod likes this.

  9. stefanhotrod

    stefanhotrod TDPRI Member

    Age:
    39
    22
    Aug 27, 2016
    germany
    Thank you! I was a bit unsure after the 1st decal silvered unfortunately.

    My plan is spraying 2 Truoil mist layers over the decal after drying and then above a handful rubbed TO layers to prevent the decal. I‘m using ultrathin Rothko & Frost decals so I guess TO should cover the decal safely.
     

  10. GS37

    GS37 TDPRI Member

    Age:
    63
    21
    May 27, 2017
    Oakland
    One last question---is it safe to spray StewMac's tinted nitrocellulose lacquer on a neck that has 3 hardened coats of Tru Oil? It'll be lightly sanded down, of course.
     

  11. stefanhotrod

    stefanhotrod TDPRI Member

    Age:
    39
    22
    Aug 27, 2016
    germany
    I‘m by far not a Truoil mentor ;) but I guess Nitro over Truoil is good, Truoil over Nitro not!
     

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