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correct process to apply and polish tru-oil to get a High gloss?

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by mangus, Feb 3, 2018.

  1. jmoore65

    jmoore65 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    59
    254
    Sep 27, 2007
    Oz
    I got a nice, reasonably glossy finish on River Redgum (Eucalyptus Camaldulensis) by sanding first to around 600, then applying around 20 thin coats using pads made from an old t-shirt.

    I went over each coat after it had dried with 0000 grade steel wool before applying the next coat. The final finish can be buffed with a soft rag after you leave it for a week or two to harden.
     

  2. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

    Jul 6, 2012
    North of Boston
    Random thought, when using a pad to apply the tru oil, wet the pad with mineral spirits first. It helps keep the pad wet and because of that not much TO gets wasted with the pad/rag.
     

  3. mangus

    mangus TDPRI Member

    Age:
    34
    98
    Nov 2, 2016
    Portugal
    If only I knew what to call mineral spirits in Portuguese... Is it alcohol, benzine or naphta?
     

  4. Mat UK

    Mat UK Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

    Feb 17, 2009
    London, UK
    In the UK it’s commonly known as white spirit or turps... if that helps
     

  5. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Aug 3, 2010
    Loganville, Ga.
    44E88D5E-666B-49DC-A119-8A473E90B39B.jpeg
    QUOTE="mangus, post: 8161390, member: 132821"]If only I knew what to call mineral spirits in Portuguese... Is it alcohol, benzine or naphta?[/QUOTE]

    I found a can in my basement that has bilingual Labelling in Spanish—I know it’s not the same as Portuguese, but at least is European, and maybe a worker at your local paint store knows it by the Spanish name. Look at the smaller print right under “Diluyente de Pintura” at the smaller print, which says “fabricado con Destilados de Petroleo”. I think that’s it.

    Hope this helps.
     

  6. mangus

    mangus TDPRI Member

    Age:
    34
    98
    Nov 2, 2016
    Portugal
    diluente and paint thinner is the same thing but there'are synthetic and celulose paint thinner. which one? would it be ok if I used naphta instead?
     

  7. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Aug 3, 2010
    Loganville, Ga.
    Naphtha might work to thin TruOil, but I don’t know for sure, and naphtha is flammable, mineral spirits is combustible, meaning its much less dangerous from a fire standpoint. Also, naphtha will evaporate or “flash off” much more quickly than mineral spirits, which might ruin your finish. They are both products of crude oil refining, and petroleum based. (As is gasoline/petrol for that matter)

    So the term that appears to equate to “ petroleum distillate” doesn’t help any?


    Celuluose paint thinner is, from my online research, lacquer thinner, and is not the right thinner For TruOil but synthetic thinner may be the right one, as one of the articles I found states that tree-derived thinner (turpentine) is considered “natural”, so it follows that the refined petroleum paint thinner is synthetic. I wish I could provide you with a more definitive answer. The right stuff will have an unpleasant, chemical odor, some say reminiscent of kerosine, or perhaps slightly oily smell.
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2018

  8. mangus

    mangus TDPRI Member

    Age:
    34
    98
    Nov 2, 2016
    Portugal
    what problem would come of not using any of them and just applying the to?
     

  9. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

    Jul 6, 2012
    North of Boston
    close to Naptha...similar ingredients...see ricks post ;)
     

  10. mangus

    mangus TDPRI Member

    Age:
    34
    98
    Nov 2, 2016
    Portugal
    so, can I use it? Provided it's petroleum based
     

  11. old wrench

    old wrench Tele-Meister

    Mineral spirits = mineral turpentine = paint thinner = turpentine substitute = white spirits = Stoddard solvent = Varsol

    I think you'd be OK using the same stuff as your hardware store sells for thinning oil-based paints.

    Mineral spirits is a bit "heavier" than naptha, has constituents with longer carbon chains.

    Best Regards,
    Geo.
     

  12. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Aug 3, 2010
    Loganville, Ga.
    Nothing at all. TruOil is designed to be used straight from the bottle. Thinning it is just a way to make it slightly easier to flow out. Applied carefully in thin coats, and leveling every few coats with very fine abrasive will also produce a glossy coat.

    A very good suggestion from TruOil is to only make a pinhole in the foil seal under the cap. This helps it stay fresh and thin as long as possible so it will flow on smoothly, and help keep it from skinning over in the bottle, plus it helps you dispense just a little at a time, which is the proper way to use it. A lot of problems are caused by over applying it.
     
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  13. mangus

    mangus TDPRI Member

    Age:
    34
    98
    Nov 2, 2016
    Portugal

  14. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

    Age:
    65
    Mar 2, 2003
    Lawndale CA
    Absolutely untrue.

    The two are very close, but naphtha is the one that's safe on all finishes and plastics. Many professional techs keep a bottle of naphtha on their workbench as it's used daily.

    FWIW I was in the coatings/solvents business for close to 40 years and have done tech work for longer.
     

  15. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Aug 3, 2010
    Loganville, Ga.
    Please stop trolling other people. It seems like most of your posts are made to contradict what others have said.

    1. It is not “absolutely untrue”.
    2. The Birchwood Casey website instructs users to use mineral spirits, not naptha, to thin TruOil. Not mineral spirits or a close relative. I do not know that naptha would be suitable as a thinner for TruOil, and neither do you, unless you have successfully done so.
    3. “Close” in what way? Typical MS volatility is 10x lower than Naptha, and there is a similar correlation between vapor pressure of the two substances. There is a very bright line between the two substances, naptha is flammable and mineral spirits is combustible. You may not be aware of it, but that’s a big difference. Especially in terms of personal safety.
    4. Please name a finish/ plastic on which ms is unsafe, but naptha is safe. They are both petroleum distillates, you say they are close, their chemical properties show that naptha is hotter, so it doesn’t make sense that naptha would be “safer” for “ all finishes and plastics”. Neither is safe, or applicable for a wide range of waterborne finishes, so “all finishes” is absolutely untrue.
    5. Yes, we know you were in the paint and coatings business for “close to 40 years”, you rarely post anything without reminding us of it.
    6. You often provide very good, solid information, but it seems you have a need to disparage others’ statements in doing so, and it is not necessary, and sometimes you overstep your bounds.
     

  16. RamblingRebel

    RamblingRebel TDPRI Member

    Age:
    40
    5
    Aug 28, 2017
    Ireland
    I use naptha/lighter fluid to thin it and it works fine. I followed Tom Pettingill(?) advice here when I was first using tru-oil and it works great. I've also tried the quick/lazy way too and it works well, although you will have a thicker barrier of oil over the wood. Prep the wood to 320 grit sandpaper. Seal the wood with a few coats of tru-oil as previously stated.

    Then pour some oil in a cup then add naptha/lighter fluid at about a quarter amount of the oil you used. give it a bit of a swirl, gently though coz it can bubble. then pour (gently) directly on the guitar. leave it to dry for 24hrs to be safe (you can add some where the neckplate goes to use as a touch test) but be gentle as it can look dry and feel dry, but under the skin it is still curing and can easily 'slide off' if your fingers dig in while you handle it (a very upsetting experience).

    After it is dry, wet sand with 1000 to get rid of bubbles dust ect and to flatten the surface. If everything is looking good at this point and you havent sanded thru the layer you can leave it for a week to cure before polishing.

    If you find you are getting witness lines just add another glaze coat and gently wet sand the imprefections out until it is dull all over. Then leave for a week to cure enough to be polished.

    Don't try to polish before a week though. If you start polishing too soon it will kinda smear and ruin it.

    Heres a sample of one I did: http://www.tdpri.com/threads/experiment-with-clay-epoxy-resin-and-tru-oil.779209/
     

  17. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

    Age:
    65
    Mar 2, 2003
    Lawndale CA
    I'm sorry you were offended, and if I was unclear.

    To clarify - it's untrue that naphtha might "ruin your finish". You made exactly that statement in your post. You may not have intended it to read that way, but that's precisely what it states. I made no other claims or statements - you're attacking me over things I DIDN'T say.

    You're the one with a problem, buddy. An imaginary one. Please get over it.

    o_O
     

  18. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Aug 3, 2010
    Loganville, Ga.

    Apology accepted.o_O

    Please present your evidence or experience that Naptha won’t flash off so quickly that it will ruin a TruOil finish.

    It may not, and that would be fine, but compared with mineral spirits, naptha’s chemical properties suggest that could be a problem. That is what I said. Thinning finish with a solvent other than what the manufacturer recommends as a thinner COULD be a problem, wouldn’t you agree?

    No reply necessary, Buddy. ;)
     
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  19. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

    Age:
    65
    Mar 2, 2003
    Lawndale CA
    First - Tru Oil is nothing exotic or unusual - it's a low-solids varnish (one major reason it's no longer available in some areas as it does not comply with air quality regulations due to the low solids content). It's chemical resistance is no different than that of any other common varnish.

    Aside from my "day job" I've been finishing and doing tech work on all manner of string instruments since (roughly) 1972. I've used naphtha as a cleaner and wet sanding agent on varnishes and lacquers for as long as I can remember - including Tru Oil. So do other techs around here. As I mentioned about naphtha, it's a common workbench "tool" used for everything form cleaning metal parts to fretboards to removing adhesives and inks from all common coatings.

    FWIW my oldest son is a gun enthusiast that has been using naphtha to clean oil-based contaminants off Tru Oil and similarly coated rifle stocks for several years. And didn't learn it from me.

    It's a bit hard to be overly detailed as it's about as common around here as using 3m pads for fret cleaning.
     

  20. mangus

    mangus TDPRI Member

    Age:
    34
    98
    Nov 2, 2016
    Portugal
    I wish I could find 3m scotchbrite pads around here.. I can only find the kitchen variety. THey're not the same are they?
     

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